Immigration Law

PRESIDENT OBAMA’S EXECUTIVE ACTION

On November 20, 2014, President Obama announced his “immigration accountability executive action”, which includes a series of measures that are first steps towards reforms to an outdated immigration system. The President authorized the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to significantly expand its use of deferred action to provide temporary protection from removal for millions of unauthorized immigrants currently in the U.S. This will be accomplished through expansion of the current Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, as well as the creation of a new deferred action program, the Deferred Action for Parental Accountability (DAPA).

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) is a prosecutorial discretion program administered by USCIS that provides temporary relief from deportation (deferred action) and work authorization to certain young people brought to the United States as children – often called “DREAMers.”

Deferred Action for Parental Accountability (DAPA) is a prosecutorial discretion program administered by USCIS that provides temporary relief from deportation (deferred action) and work authorization to unauthorized parents of U.S. citizens or Lawful Permanent Residents (LPRs). The DAPA program resembles the DACA program in some respects, but the eligibility criteria are distinct.

Jason Knowles is experienced in assisting with these programs. If you need help, give him a call at 256-547-7200, or contact us through this website.


Family – Based Immigration - Ley de Inmigración

Since its founding, the United States has placed a strong emphasis on the importance of family. Immigration laws are intended to keep families together and strengthen those ties. Due to some restrictions, however, this may prove difficult. The family-based immigration process requires complicated forms and paperwork. Knowles & Sullivan, LLC, is committed to providing reasonably priced, quality professional representation in obtaining your relatives’ immigrant visa and lawful permanent resident status.

The procedure involved in bringing a foreign relative to permanently live in the United States is a multi-step process that is highly specific in its requirements. We will inform you of each step of the process as it occurs to ensure that you are well aware of the status of your case. Our firm is committed to providing quality legal representation, careful document preparation, and expedited processing of your petition. We will carefully guide you and your relatives through the complicated process to a successful conclusion. If you or a loved one needs help with this process, please do not hesitate to contact Jason Knowles in our office.

Jason Knowles is experienced in assisting with this process. If you need help, give him a call at 256.547.7200, or contact us through this website.


Citizenship Through Naturalization

Naturalization is the process by which U.S. citizenship is granted to a foreign citizen or national after he or she fulfills the requirements established by Congress in the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA). In most cases, an applicant for naturalization must be a permanent resident (green card holder) before filing. Usually, naturalization can only be granted in the United States.

A foreign national may qualify for naturalization if:

  1. He or she has been a permanent resident for at least 5 years and meets all other eligibility requirements.

  2. He or she has been a permanent resident for 3 years or more and meets all eligibility requirements to file as a spouse of a U.S. citizen.

  3. He or she has qualifying service in the U.S. armed forces and meets all other eligibility requirements.

  4. A child may qualify for naturalization if you are a U.S. citizen, the child was born outside the United States, the child is currently residing outside the United States, and all other eligibility requirements are met.

One of the requirements for U.S. citizenship through naturalization is to take the naturalization test to demonstrate that you are able to read, write, and speak basic English and that you have a basic knowledge of U.S. history and government.


Green Card Through Family

Many people become permanent residents (get a green card) through family members. The United States promotes family unity and allows U.S. citizens and permanent residents to petition for certain relatives to come and live permanently in the U.S. A foreign national may be eligible to get a green card through a family member who is a U.S. citizen or permanent residence.

There are two paths through which a foreign national can get a green card. Many family members who are already in the U.S. may qualify for adjustment of status to permanent residents in the United States, which means they are able to complete their immigrant processing without having to return to their home country. Those relatives outside the United States or those who are not eligible to adjust status in the United States may be eligible for consular processing through a U.S. embassy or consulate abroad.

Gadsden Immigration Lawyer Jason Knowles is experienced in assisting with this process. If you need help, give him a call at 256.547.7200, or contact us through this website.

 

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